Central Alabama Nurse Practitioner Association

2021 Psychiatric Speaker Series: TARDIVE DYSKINESIA (TD) CAUSES & TREATMENTS: THE PSYCHIATRIC NURSE PRACTITIONER PERSPECTIVE

Posted about 1 month ago

 

Teva Neuroscience, Inc. is pleased to invite you to an exciting new virtual webcast:

TARDIVE DYSKINESIA (TD) CAUSES & TREATMENTS:

THE PSYCHIATRIC NURSE PRACTITIONER PERSPECTIVE

 Register http://www.tdpsychseries.com/

On Thursday, April 8, 2021 at 8 PM ET/ 5 PM PT, you will have the opportunity to hear some of the nation’s leading psychiatric nurse practitioners and top psychiatrists bring their unique perspectives and insights into an exploration of the current scientific consensus on TD and issues surrounding its clinical management, with emphasis on the assessment of TD and best practices for educating and providing support for patients and caregivers. Our panel of experts will explain the hypothesized neurobiological imbalances underlying TD and their consequences for treatment. They will also discuss the role of AUSTEDO® in the treatment of TD. The session concludes with a Q&A, where you’ll have the chance to interact with the speakers.

 

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

AUSTEDO® (deutetrabenazine) tablets is indicated for the treatment of chorea associated with Huntington’s disease and for the treatment of tardive dyskinesia in adu‌lts.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Depression and Suicidality in Patients with Huntington’s Disease: AUSTEDO can increase the risk of depression and suicidal thoughts and behavior (suicidality) in patients with Huntington’s disease. Balance the risks of depression and suicidality with the clinical need for treatment of chorea. Closely monitor patients for the emergence or worsening of depression, suicidality, or unusual changes in behavior. Inform patients, their caregivers, and families of the risk of depression and suicidality and instruct them to report behaviors of concern promptly to the treating physician. Exercise caution when treating patients with a history of depression or prior suicide attempts or ideation. AUSTEDO is contraindicated in patients who are suicidal, and in patients with untreated or inadequately treated depression.

Please see additional Important Safety Information continued below and full Prescribing Information, including Boxed Warning.

 

The topics covered in this session have been developed to help you:

Learn about in-person and virtual assessment of TD

Understand how to provide effective education and treatment support for patients and caregivers

Learn about the hypothesized dopamine imbalance in TD and how it may affect the clinical management of TD

Evaluate hypothetical patient cases to understand the role of VMAT2 inhibition in the treatment of TD

Evaluate the role of AUSTEDO® in the management of TD

Please register today for this exciting virtual program—and for your chance to be at the cutting edge of the science and treatment of TD.

 

 

Meet the Experts

Amber Hoberg, 
APRN, MSN, PMHNP-BC

GeroPsych Associates of Central Texas

Morning Star Family Medicine PLLC

David B. Hughes, 
GNP-BC, BHRT-BC

Geriatric Essentials, PC

TeamHealth

Stephen M. Stahl, 
MD, PhD, DSc (Hon)

Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego

Honorary Visiting Senior Fellow at the University of Cambridge, UK

Director of Psychopharmacology for the California Department of State Hospitals

 

 

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION (Continued)

Contraindications: AUSTEDO is contraindicated in patients with Huntington’s disease who are suicidal, or have untreated or inadequately treated depression. AUSTEDO is also contraindicated in: patients with hepatic impairment; patients taking reserpine or within 20 days of discontinuing reserpine; patients taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), or within 14 days of discontinuing MAOI therapy; and patients taking tetrabenazine (Xenazine®) or valbenazine (Ingrezza®).

Clinical Worsening and Adverse Events in Patients with Huntington’s Disease: AUSTEDO may cause a worsening in mood, cognition, rigidity, and functional capacity. Prescribers should periodically re-evaluate the need for AUSTEDO in their patients by assessing the effect on chorea and possible adverse effects.

QTc Prolongation: AUSTEDO may prolong the QT interval, but the degree of QT prolongation is not clinically significant when AUSTEDO is administered within the recommended dosage range. AUSTEDO should be avoided in patients with congenital long QT syndrome and in patients with a history of cardiac arrhythmias.

Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS), a potentially fatal symptom complex reported in association with drugs that reduce dopaminergic transmission, has been observed in patients receiving tetrabenazine. The risk may be increased by concomitant use of dopamine antagonists or antipsychotics. The management of NMS should include immediate discontinuation of AUSTEDO; intensive symptomatic treatment and medical monitoring; and treatment of any concomitant serious medical problems.

Akathisia, Agitation, and Restlessness: AUSTEDO may increase the risk of akathisia, agitation, and restlessness. The risk of akathisia may be increased by concomitant use of dopamine antagonists or antipsychotics. If a patient develops akathisia, the AUSTEDO dose should be reduced; some patients may require discontinuation of therapy.

Parkinsonism: AUSTEDO may cause parkinsonism in patients with Huntington’s disease or tardive dyskinesia. Parkinsonism has also been observed with other VMAT2 inhibitors. The risk of parkinsonism may be increased by concomitant use of dopamine antagonists or antipsychotics. If a patient develops parkinsonism, the AUSTEDO dose should be reduced; some patients may require discontinuation of therapy.

Sedation and Somnolence: Sedation is a common dose-limiting adverse reaction of AUSTEDO. Patients should not perform activities requiring mental alertness, such as operating a motor vehicle or hazardous machinery, until they are on a maintenance dose of AUSTEDO and know how the drug affects them. Concomitant use of alcohol or other sedating drugs may have additive effects and worsen sedation and somnolence.

Hyperprolactinemia: Tetrabenazine elevates serum prolactin concentrations in humans. If there is a clinical suspicion of symptomatic hyperprolactinemia, appropriate laboratory testing should be done and consideration should be given to discontinuation of AUSTEDO.

Binding to Melanin-Containing Tissues: Deutetrabenazine or its metabolites bind to melanin-containing tissues and could accumulate in these tissues over time. Prescribers should be aware of the possibility of long-term ophthalmologic effects.

Common Adverse Reactions: The most common adverse reactions for AUSTEDO (>8% and greater than placebo) in a controlled clinical study in patients with Huntington’s disease were somnolence, diarrhea, dry mouth, and fatigue. The most common adverse reactions for AUSTEDO (4% and greater than placebo) in controlled clinical studies in patients with tardive dyskinesia were nasopharyngitis and insomnia.

Please see Important Safety Information above and accompanying full Prescribing Information, including Boxed Warning.

If you need anything from us related to AUSTEDO®, or have any questions at all, please feel free to reach out to me via phone at 2058214953 - SUSAN APPEL.

 

 

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  AUS-42621   February 2021

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